Media Influencer

helping people break out of pigeonholes since 2003

Daily links 05/29/2012

TAGS: None

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 05/28/2012

TAGS: None

Daily links 05/27/2012

TAGS: None

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 05/21/2012

TAGS: None

  • tags: gmail security hole technology phishing

  • tags: ambient connectivity bob frankston infrastructure

    • The nuanced definition of Ambient Connectivity is that we can view connectivity as infrastructure but we need to take responsibility if we find ourselves disconnected. This is in contrast with today’s telecom industry in which we’ve shifted responsibility to providers and can only assume connectivity where a third party has subscribed to a service and there is an unbroken chain of providers all the way to your destination.
    • This familiar scenario presumes that the Internet is the web and that telephony is something else. This is an impoverished view of the Internet’s connectivity. A major insight from information sciences (AKA, computing) is that we can convert information we transmit to bits and that all bits are the same. There is no difference between voice bits and other bits.

       

    • We’ve gotten so much value out of what we can do using existing subscription paths, as with our computers at home and our smartphones, we fail to see how much more is possible.
    • This is the essence of the Internet’s architecture – you can simply drop a packet of bits onto the network and it will find its way to the destination. Or maybe not – rather than rely on a network provider you take responsibility. If the bits must get there and you don’t get an acknowledgment you can try again. This is called “best efforts” networking. It’s a very simple idea that has dramatically changed our concept of communicating – rather than being dependent upon telecom providers we can take advantage of any available opportunity to communicate.
    • Thus if all we have available is a repurposed video distribution system, AKA, broadband, we shouldn’t be surprised to find that it is good for distributing video, as in the example of YouTube. Similarly with Smartphones we can communicate as long as we have the right subscription plan and the cellular provider has service where we happen to be and we comply with terms of services.
    • Simply repurposing existing telecom paths isn’t enough if we are to get the benefits of all that we’ve learned about digital communications. We need to be able to assume connectivity outside the confines of the subscription paths and we need to be able to add paths ourselves without needing to justify them to a provider.
  • tags: places email internet heterarchy network business commercial protocol web

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 05/12/2012

TAGS: None

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 05/11/2012

TAGS: None

Daily links 05/08/2012

TAGS: None

  • quite interesting and insightful. apart from the Lanier veneration, of course. ;)

    • However, with the gimlet eyes of a new blogger, I detect ominous portents of change. First, I see that Hitch’s article has been featured on the Vanity Fair website for the better part of a week and has garnered only 813 Facebook likes and 75 Tweets. Many of my blog articles receive more engagement than this, some by nearly a factor of 10. No doubt this has something to do with the ratio of signal to noise: When readers come to a personal blog, they are more or less guaranteed to read what the author has written. How many people will find Hitch’s article on the Vanity Fair website?
    • I hesitate to read too much into these metrics, but it doesn’t seem entirely crazy to wonder whether a significant percentage of the people who have read Hitch’s essay in the last week read it in the last hour because I broadcast it on social media. I used to view this as a wonderful synergy—digital enables print; print points back to digital; and both thrive. I now consider it the death knell for traditional publishing.
    • I can count on one finger the number of places where it is still obviously better for me to publish than on my own blog—the opinion page of The New York Times. But it’s not so much better that I’ve been tempted to send them an article in the last few months. Is this just the hubris of the blogosphere? Maybe—but not for everyone and not for long.
    • For instance, I’ve started to think that most books are too long, and I now hesitate before buying the next big one. When shopping for books, I’ve suddenly become acutely sensitive to the opportunity costs of reading any one of them. If your book is 600 pages long, you are demanding more of my time than I feel free to give. And if I could accomplish the same change in my view of the world by reading a 60-page version of your argument, why didn’t you just publish a book this length instead?
    • Publishers can’t charge enough money for 60-page books to survive; thus, writers can’t make a living by writing them. But readers are beginning to feel that this shouldn’t be their problem. Worse, many readers believe that they can just jump on YouTube and watch the author speak at a conference, or skim his blog, and they will have absorbed most of what he has to say on a given subject. In some cases this is true and suggests an enduring problem for the business of publishing. In other cases it clearly isn’t true and suggests an enduring problem for our intellectual life.
  • Really great account of the experience with the publishing industry, in and out, and the journey to the other side, i.e. online world of distributed distribution, aka piracy amongst those who can’t keep up.

    tags: sweden publishing piracy distribution politics

    • Regarding the pirate issue, I did not lack ideas about what to do. I united with my colleagues in the publishing world and this time no-one stopped me from pulling my weight. I wrote a pastiche of Marc Antony’s funeral speech in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar that had a nice air of fire and brimstone to it. There is no need to go into all the gory details of all the poetic and dramatic flaws in my pastiche, I think it is quite sufficient to say that I was burying copyright and that the (not so) honourable men were pirates.
    • After a week or so, I realised that when I talked to anti pirates, they did not give me any answers. They were all doom and gloom and talked about how good it used to be in the good old days. The pirates gave me answers, albeit not always the ones I wanted. I asked how I would be able to control my work, and they said: “You can’t. You never could.” I asked how I would make money in a world were my work was available free online, and they said: “You have to find new ways.” But they said other things as well. When they talked about the future they talked about wonderful possibilities. The anti pirates talked with grim voices, the pirates spoke with voices filled with hope and creativity.
    • The pirates did not want to lock culture up in copyright and only let the highest bidder sneak a peak. They wanted to let it roam freely. They wanted it to belong to all of us. And, quite apart from popular, lobby sponsored understanding, they did not want artists to live in poverty in a shoebox on a motorway. They wanted to find ways for artists to earn money. They searched for new solutions to an old problem that had been there long before there even were any pirates.
  • fairly decent exposition of the problem of privacy in social networks

    tags: privacy social social networks networks perspective

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 05/04/2012

TAGS: None

  • Finally! This would be wonderful. Almost like back in 2001 when you could find many academic papers online. 

    tags: research wikipedia government open publishers academic

  • yeah, penny’s dropping, at least for T B-L re cross-analysis and correlations between various data sets, never mind getting hold of them.  

    tags: privacy google facebook data personal TimBerners-Lee threat internet

    • Exploiting such data could provide hugely useful services to individuals, he said, but only if their computers had access to personal data held about them by web companies. “One of the issues of social networking silos is that they have the data and I don’t … There are no programmes that I can run on my computer which allow me to use all the data in each of the social networking systems that I use plus all the data in my calendar plus in my running map site, plus the data in my little fitness gadget and so on to really provide an excellent support to me.”
    • Once the data outputs from different sites had been standardised, he said, our computers would be able to offer increasingly sophisticated services such as telling us what to read in the morning
    • He said web users needed to be more conscious that websites that seemed to be permanent fixtures of the online world could disappear within a few years. “Whatever social site, wherever you put your data, you should make sure that you can get it back and get it back in a standard form.
    • He is most worried by moves by some makers of laptop operating systems to “lock those down too, because they like the environment of the locked-down phone”. He said such limited operating systems could improve security but “on the other hand this is the end of the road for the general innovative space which is general computers.”
    • He said the development of a “do not track” protocol, currently being debated by the Federal Trade Commission, would increase web users’ confidence that data about them was not being abused – by “flipping a switch” on their browsers they will be able to instruct websites not to track their online behaviour.
    • Even though the Sopa and Pipa acts were stopped by huge public outcry, it’s staggering how quickly the US government has come back with a new, different, threat to the rights of its citizens.”

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • Author: Adriana
  • Published: May 3rd, 2012
  • Category: Stuff
  • Comments: 1

Daily links 05/03/2012

TAGS: None

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 05/02/2012

TAGS: None

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 05/01/2012

TAGS: None

© 2009 Media Influencer. All Rights Reserved.

This blog is powered by Wordpress and Magatheme by Bryan Helmig.