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Daily links 11/30/2011

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    • “I don’t think there’s been a time in recent history where the industry has had a more divergent approach to the future,” says Cavan Redmond, group president of corporate strategy at Pfizer Inc. “It means that we’ll have different ways of dealing with healthcare, especially on the pharmaceutical side, and less homogeneity.”
    • After years of steady and predictable growth, the pharmaceutical industry is entering a stochastic period of its own. That pharmaceutical companies have divergent views of how the future will evolve is evident in what they’ve done in the area of mergers and acquisitions.
  • I always wondered about that, seemed a bit far-fetched and really inconvenient if you have only kindle to read and stuck on tarmac waiting for take off. :-/

    tags: plane flights electronics FAA aviation fear safety

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Daily links 11/29/2011

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 11/28/2011

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • Author: Adriana
  • Published: Nov 25th, 2011
  • Category: Stuff
  • Comments: 1

Daily links 11/25/2011

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 11/24/2011

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  • I hope he’s right that it’s enough to just wait it out but I am increasingly not so sure…

    tags: socialgraph socialmedia facebook graph networks google semantic web

    • In order to model something as a graph, you have to have a clear definition of what its nodes and edges represent. In most social sites, this does not pose a problem. The nodes are users, while edges means something like ‘accepted a connection request from’, or ‘followed’, or ‘exchanged email with’, depending on where you are.
    • But when you start talking about building a social graph that transcends any specific implementation, you quickly find yourself in the weeds. Is accepting someone’s invitation on LinkedIn the same kind of connection as mutually following them on Twitter? Can we define some generic connections like ‘fan of’ or ‘follower’ and re-use them for multiple sites? Does it matter that you can see who your followers are on site X but not on site Y?
    • This is supposed to be a canonical representation of human relationships. But it only takes five minutes of reading the existing standards to see that they’re completely inadequate.
    • This obsession with modeling has led us into a social version of the Uncanny Valley, that weird phenomenon from computer graphics where the more faithfully you try to represent something human, the creepier it becomes. As the model becomes more expressive, we really start to notice the places where it fails.
    • Leaving aside the technical issues of how to implemented, how does cutting ties actually work socially? Is there any way to be discreet, for example, or have connections naturally degrade over time? In real life, all relationships fade naturally if you don’t maintain them, but right now social networks preserve ties in amber until we explicitly break them. Is my sister going to resent me if I finally defriend her annoying husband? Can I unfollow my ex now, or is that going to make her think I’m still hung up on her?
    • You might almost think that the whole scheme had been cooked up by a bunch of hyperintelligent but hopelessly socially naive people, and you would not be wrong. Asking computer nerds to design social software is a little bit like hiring a Mormon bartender. Our industry abounds in people for whom social interaction has always been more of a puzzle to be reverse-engineered than a good time to be had, and the result is these vaguely Martian protocols.
    • Imagine the U.S. Census as conducted by direct marketers – that’s the social graph.  

      Social networks exist to sell you crap. The icky feeling you get when your friend starts to talk to you about Amway, or when you spot someone passing out business cards at a birthday party, is the entire driving force behind a site like Facebook.   

      Because their collection methods are kind of primitive, these sites have to coax you into doing as much of your social interaction as possible while logged in, so they can see it. It’s as if an ad agency built a nationwide chain of pubs and night clubs in the hopes that people would spend all their time there, rigging the place with microphones and cameras to keep abreast of the latest trends (and staffing it, of course, with that Mormon bartender).

    • We’re used to talking about how disturbing this in the context of privacy, but it’s worth pointing out how weirdly unsocial it is, too. How are you supposed to feel at home when you know a place is full of one-way mirrors?
    • Open data advocates tell us the answer is to reclaim this obsessive dossier for ourselves, so we can decide where to store it. But this misses the point of how stifling it is to have such a permanent record in the first place. Who does that kind of thing and calls it social?
    • Now tell me one bit of original culture that’s ever come out of Facebook.
    • Thank God we left ourselves the freedom to blunder into the series of fortuitous decisions that gave us the Web.
  • tags: health jetlag food sleep travel science productivity lifehack

  • tags: security HTTPS hacking cryptography privacy

    • Unfortunately, is still feasible for some attackers to break HTTPS. Leaving aside cryptographic protocol vulnerabilities, there are structural ways for its authentication mechanism to be fooled for any domain, including mail.google.com, www.citibank.com, www.eff.org, addons.mozilla.org, or any other incredibly sensitive service:
    • In short: there are a lot of ways to break HTTPS/TLS/SSL today, even when websites do everything right. As currently implemented, the Web’s security protocols may be good enough to protect against attackers with limited time and motivation, but they are inadequate for a world in which geopolitical and business contests are increasingly being played out through attacks against the security of computer systems.
  • tags: hackers leak facebook law enforcement guidelines privacy security anonymous

  • this may be the realise of the online marketing but that doesn’t make it right. to argue that personalisation is a fair price for customer data implies an agreement by the customer somehow. I don’t have much choice and opting out is hard, so this is not a fair exchange. 

    tags: consumer data mining personaldata ownership marketing customisation

    • Internet advertising is growing faster than advertising in any other medium — an average of 14.6% per year, according to ZenithOptimedia, a media services agency. Online advertising will overtake newspapers to capture 18.9% of the global ad market by 2013, becoming the world’s second-largest advertising medium next to television, the agency forecasts.
    • In 2011, Facebook will likely amass $3.8 billion in global ad revenues, predicts digital intelligence firm eMarketer. The social media giant now gathers data from more than 800 million active users who post in 70 languages. And search giant Google, which pulled in $9.72 billion in advertising revenues in the third quarter alone, makes 96% of its revenues from advertising. In regulatory filings, Google attributes its healthy profit to “the relevance and quality of both our search results and the advertisements displayed.”

       

    • “Consumers expect personalization and expect to be social and share information, often in public, with others online,” says Shawndra Hill, a Wharton operations and information management professor. “As target marketing and recommendation engines become more a part of our daily experience, users are becoming more aware that their personal and behavioral information is being used by firms for advertising…. Some people care about their digital privacy. But it is often the case that consumers are willing to give up their ‘data liberties’ in return for something useful, desirable and assumed free. So in essence, consumers pay for services with personal data.”
    • Studies show most online users suspect their behavior is being tracked, but either don’t care or don’t know how to prevent it. A 2011 survey by New York-based market research firm Harris Interactive and TRUSTe, a company that helps clients such as Facebook, Microsoft and Apple comply with privacy requirements, found that 30% of consumers believe advertisers are obtaining personal information such as phone numbers, email and physical addresses without their consent. More than half (52%) assumed that their online browsing behavior had been shared with advertisers without their approval.
    • “There’s a broader feeling from consumers of progressively losing control over their digital identities and information.” The growing tension stems in part from “a world-view conflict that’s happening between privacy-conscious consumers and radical, transparency-supporting entrepreneurs,” she notes. Tech entrepreneurs start off with a different mindset than the average consumer: They believe unlimited information sharing is good. Since computer code tends to carry the values of its creators, they naturally build their views into their platforms. “Without full disclosure of how information is being shared, most consumers won’t be able to understand how the code works on the websites they’re using, and will feel that they are essentially being unfairly turned into a product.”
    • Unwieldy, non-negotiable user agreements don’t help. Many online agreements allow companies to alter contracts even after the user has signed, giving consumers little real choice about how their data is shared. “I don’t know anyone who can take the time to read a 58-page agreement on a 3-inch smartphone screen, even assuming they have spectacularly good eyesight,” Matwyshyn says. Meanwhile, the industry is pushing self-regulation. The Digital Advertising Alliance, a coalition of advertisers and media companies, is adopting a set of principles and has developed an “Ad Choices” icon that can be displayed on sites to signify to consumers that they have the ability to opt out of targeted ads.
    • “Our results suggest that the current approach for advertising industry self-regulation through opt-out mechanisms is fundamentally flawed,” the study notes. “Users’ expectations and abilities are not supported by existing approaches…. Even with additional education and better user interfaces, it is not clear whether users are capable of making meaningful choices about trackers.”
    • In the rush to collect and connect, he adds, the data itself has become the focus — not the customer. Customers make many online purchases for random reasons that don’t contribute to a meaningful profile, Fader argues. “How granular should our messaging get? The one-to-one is going too far. Just because we have two or three data points on a customer doesn’t mean we’ve nailed them down.”
    • Standard arguments about privacy miss the point, Turow adds. People usually focus on personally identifiable information such as names and addresses, and feel their privacy has been violated only if that type of data is shared. But even if they remain anonymous, Turow points out, “people are having their reputations constructed…. If a company knows 100 data points about me in the digital environment, and that affects how that company treats me in the digital world, what’s the difference if they know my name or not?”

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • Author: Adriana
  • Published: Nov 18th, 2011
  • Category: Stuff
  • Comments: 1

Daily links 11/18/2011

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Daily links 11/17/2011

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  • tags: economics markets systeme D shadow economy third world africa china government taxes

  • tags: internet censorship blocking SOPA IP copyright

  • tags: cyber war journal studies security

  • tags: privacy rootkit mobile HTC data monitoring fail

    • It turns out that CIQ is not exactly what many people don’t see (as it is hidden), but it is rather a very useful tool for system and network administrators. The tools is used to provide feedback and relevant data on several metrics that can help one of the aforementioned admins to troubleshoot and improve system and network performance. Point and case, the app seems to run in such a way that it allows the user to provide the input needed via surveys and other things. To put things in a more visual way, this is what CIQ should look like
    • In the original version of the app, the app is set to collect things such as network status, equipment ID and manufacturer, and much more. All this data is then pushed to a “portal” where the administrator can see, filter, accommodate, and virtually arrange all the metrics reported by the app in any way he/she sees fit. What is more, according to some of the training documents, CIQ can virtually consider anything as a metric, and record it.
    • There is little that we can do about this data being collected without us rooting the device and breaking the warranties on them (not that we usually care about doing this anyways). But the problem is that all this data, all this information about you, how you use your device, your every day activities, everything you do with your device is logged and sold. Not too long ago, Verizon came forth (probably as they saw this coming) and decided to provide its customers with the option to opt out of this activity. Basically, preventing Big Red from selling your data (but not from collecting it). Sprint, on the other hand, has gone as far as denying its existence at one point. Now, we know that this is all part of the contract that you go into when you buy a phone from them, right? Wrong! According to Sprint, even if you were to buy a device straight out of eBay and have no service on Sprint (use it as a Wifi media player if you will), Sprint can still collect this data from you. You are bound and chained with them, even if you never planned on doing this.
    • what kind of permissible purpose is out there that can allow a company to legally place a key logger on something and use it when you are not even getting service out of them? This is far beyond, at this point, the fact that the data could potentially be accessed, intercepted, or even loop holes being present in the code. This is a matter of our rights to privacy as consumers.
    • This is a clear infringement of consumer rights in down to its core. Not being able to opt out is downright ridiculous and we would like to request that this is fixed in upcoming devices and software updates. Remember, we may not be the vast majority of your users/customers, but unfortunately for you, our communities are the ones who can make your sales efforts into a living nightmare. Consumers are the ultimate key holders and we suggest that you stop looking at us as dollar signs and more like people and customers. All in all, I am not for sale and my privacy is priceless.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 11/16/2011

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • Author: Adriana
  • Published: Nov 14th, 2011
  • Category: Stuff
  • Comments: 1

Daily links 11/14/2011

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 11/11/2011

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Daily links 11/10/2011

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Daily links 11/08/2011

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