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Daily links 08/30/2011

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 08/29/2011

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 08/28/2011

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Daily links 08/26/2011

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Daily links 08/25/2011

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Daily links 08/24/2011

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  • tags: platform self-hacking quantifiedself applications health development

  • Hm, disagree on a few issues – the phone hacking by NoW (before it went splat big time), paying sources etc

    tags: power news media interview Assange newspapers leaks wikileaks

  • As humans, we normally make decisions in our heads by blending related data from various domains of our lives. We model each judgement in our minds by our intentions, activities, places, and time. e.g. I want to improve my health today, so I’ll manage my diet, get some exercise, and engage in low stress activities. But our digital decision making is increasingly fragmented by the scattering of our digital information and artifacts into hundreds of discrete applications and services data stores across the web: separate health records, separate data from our diet and exercise apps and sensors, and separate data from other aspects of our lives. We  gather health information from thousands of websites and communities across the web from variously credible or incredible sources to influence our health decisions. But, we lack many mechanisms to fluidly blend and analyze our life data to make easy coherent decisions.

    tags: self-hacking health information analytics structure data

  • tags: web actions technology themineproject button

  • a must read

    tags: web actions technology online social themineproject

    • A web action is the interface and user experience of taking a specific discrete action, across the web, from one site to another site or application. They’re not a specific technology but use a variety of technologies.
    • Web actions are not “just” hyperlinks. Hyperlinks are nouns and they reference destinations (sometimes with an explicit relation) with an implied action of navigation. In contrast, web actions are verbs and are first and foremost about a specific action that often but not always does something with the current page or site.
    • While web actions often make use of AJAX techniques for responsiveness, they are distinguished by the fact that they work across sites. It is this cross-site interactivity that makes web actions explicitly web-like and thus named accordingly.
    • From the user’s perspective, the buttons and the actions they take are the feature.
    • Soon thereafter I decided to try referring to the buttons and experience as “web actions” which seemed to resonate with others
      • Web Action Motivations and Clusters

         

         Based on my research I’ve found that existing popular web actions can be placed into one of a few categories based on user motivations: 

         

        • later: “I don’t have time or this is too long!” – AKA tldr or more positively put: I want to read this later. Readability and Instapaper are examples.
        • save: “This is interesting and I want to save it!” – similar to “later”, but primarily a collection impulse. Some use saving as a read later function, but this is more about collecting, categorizing, and knowing it’s somewhere you might find it again since it might be useful some day. Bookmarking is a form of saving.
        • props – “This is cool, I like this, I want to praise it.” – This item is worthy and deserves recognition. Digg, Like, Favorite, +1 are all examples. Sometimes favoriting is used as a method of saving, but it’s special in that it indicates a positive evaluation.
        • share – “This is so good that I feel compelled to share it, my friends will want to see this, or sharing it will make me look smart, in-the-know etc.” – This item is worth passing on to friends, perhaps with commentary. Tweet, Blog This, and Tumblr are all examples.
        • follow – “I want to hear more from this author/site!” – I like this site/author, perhaps based on this post, and want to see more from them in the future. While Twitter’s Follow button is the obvious example, the earliest occurrences of this web action date back to the late 1990s and the emergence of “subscribe to my feed / RSS” buttons. This may be the oldest web action.

         

      • Intuitively a few thoughts come to mind, like perhaps place: 

         

        • “later, save, props” actions near the top of a post
        • “save, props, share” actions near the bottom of a post
        • “follow” actions somewhere global to the site, like a sidebar

         

    • Web actions have the potential to change our very notions of what a web application is from a single site to loosely coupled interactions across multiple, distributed sites. In that regard, web actions have the potential to become a building block for distributed web applications.
    • except consider describing your web actions feature primarily from a user-centric point of view, even to developers. A user-centric description will make your feature easier to understand for everyone, and will hopefully help your developers provide user-friendly documentation as well.).
  • patents are there to stop new entrants, not to protect innovation 

    tags: patents ubuntu intellectual property FAIL information secrets open source

    • The patent system is often misunderstood. It’s sold as a way of giving the little guy an opportunity to create something big … when in fact patents don’t really work that way at all.

       

      What they do very well is keep the big guys entrenched and the little guys out. For example, it’s very common in established industries for all of the majors to buy up or file as many patents as they can covering a particular area. They know and accept that the other majors are all in the same industry and essentially cross-license each other to keep the peace within that defined market. But they use that arsenal to stop new entrants coming in and disrupting the market.

    • Patents were essentially a trade for disclosure of an idea that created a good for society in exchange for a short-term monopoly.
    • The idea for us was we wanted to bring design-led engineering to the Linux desktop so we followed a fairly rigorous process of design. That meant testing assumptions and evaluating each little change on the basis of some realistic test of how people reacted to change. It is a fairly radical shift from where we were previously
    • We think that for all the excitement around tablets, most people will continue to use keyboards for real, productive work. We need a keyboard-based experience that really rocks. People who go rushing into the tablet business are going to lose money. There are few experiences out there that can compete with the iPad.
    • Open source has accelerated innovation and change and dynamism in the industry. But it’s also true that in a world where people are using the Web more and more, they don’t have the same sense of the terms and conditions attached to the software itself, so licensing is becoming less and less relevant, whether its free licensing or non-free licensing. You don’t have a sense of a big divide between the two. Everyone has access to the Web, so there is a dynamic there. The traditional software portions of the open-source world must decide what role they want to play and what’s important and exciting for them.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 08/23/2011

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily links 08/22/2011

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Daily links 08/19/2011

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Daily links 08/18/2011

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  • Author: Adriana
  • Published: Aug 17th, 2011
  • Category: Stuff
  • Comments: 2

Daily links 08/17/2011

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Daily links 08/16/2011

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